Typhoon Target by Robert Bailey

$225.00
There is only 1 item left in stock.
There is only 1 item left in stock.

The lightning advances made by the Allies after D-Day during 'Operation Cobra' and the breakout from Normandy, came to a grinding halt as supply lines stretched and German entrenchment solidified. Through the fall and into the winter, the lines of battle faltered to a stalemate, allowing the Allies to regroup and rest. Or so they thought.

Hitler had other ideas, and although cautioned to the contrary by his military advisers, designed a battle plan based on surprise and secrecy. Code-named 'Autumn Mist', the plan was to quietly amass men, tanks and planes in the Ardennes for a 'blitzkrieg' thrust to the Meuse River and on to Antwerp, in the hopes of literally dividing the Allies and repeating another 'Dunkirk'. He chose a spot on the American lines that was thinly defended.

The Allies were confident that the Germans were not capable of such an action, and were thrown into chaos when the Germans smashed through the American lines, spear-headed by two Panzer Divisions on the morning of December 16, 1944. For ten days the Germans benefited immensely from the foul weather which grounded the Allied air forces. The German advances became known as the 'Battle of the Bulge'.

With the weather finally improving on the morning of December 24, the German advance had run its course, literally running out of gas. Allied planes poured into the battlefront by the hundreds, destroying everything in front of them.

In Robert Bailey's painting TYPHOON TARGET, a King (Royal) Tiger, low on gas and nakedly exposed to air attack, runs for the cover of trees, pursued by two Typhoons of 440 Squadron, 143 Wing (RCAF), 2nd Tactical Air Force. Like 600 other units of German armor, it will not likely find a place to hide in the face of Allied counter attacks.

120 Group Edition w/THIRTEEN signatures.

F/Lt. Ken Storey joined 56 Squadron (Hurricanes) in the summer of 1941. They received the first two Typhoons issued to the Royal Air Force (September) and he flew one of these. He enjoyed two complete engine failures on Typhoons (for which they were renowned). His wrecked cockpit is currently on display at Duxford. He hit a Ju-88 on one sortie, and on a strafing run received a long line of bullet holes across the wing and spinner. At war's end he was with 29 Night Fighter Squadron (Mosquito's).

F/O George 'Lefty' Whitman was born in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. and enlisted in the R.C.A.F. in1941. In September 1942 he was posted to England with #3 (F) Squadron, R.A.F. at Manston, flying Hurricanes, Typhoons and Tempests. Shot down in September 1943 by flak and ditched in the sea. (First ever ditching of a Typhoon). While in his dinghy was strafed and wounded by two Me109's. His dinghy was sunk but he was rescued by a Walrus aircraft. He later destroyed an Me109G, the first enemy aircraft destroyed by a Tempest in the air. F/O Whitman also shot down 14 flying bombs. Later in the war he became a test pilot. His decorations include France/Germany Star and Air Defence Great Britain Medal.

F/Lt. Art Younger joined the R.C.A.F. in January 1941. After serving in the Middle East during 1942, he was with 186 Squadron in Scotland on cannon-firing Hurricanes. Converted to Typhoon in November 1943. In 1944 he was with 247 Squadron R.A.F. and was involved in Typhoon rocket attack operations in Normandy. He struck V-1 sites, 'no bail-out targets', radar sites and other ground targets. He was shot down at Falaise on August 13th, 1944 and was taken prisoner. He had a total of 69 operational sorties.

F/Lt. Ivan Mouat joined the R.C.A.F. in 1940. He trained at #3 EFTS Regina and #11 SFTS Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Shipped overseas in September 1941. He was posted to 412 Squadron on Spitfires, then to 56 Squadron on Typhoons. He was one of the first four Canadian pilots to fly this new aircraft type. He was then with 198 Squadron, also Typhoons. Ivan Mouat was shot down on July 11th., 1943 and was taken prisoner in Stalag Luft III. He has a total of 25 operational sorties.

F/O A. M. Scott. After training in Canada and a stint flying Miles Masters at Turnhill, England, Scott converted to Typhoons and joined 440 Squadron at Eindhoven, Holland. He flew a total of 30 operational trips. Among his many exciting experiences was a spectacular wheels-up landing in his Typhoon near the Rhine River after his tail had been damaged by flak.

F/Lt. C. Ivan Smith is from Ancaster. Ontario. He joined the R.C.A.F. and was sent to England in January 1943. He was posted to 268 Squadron, R.A.F. By May 1944 he was on operations. On D-Day he was over the beach-head, directing fire for battleships on to ground targets. After the squadron moved to France, they were bombarded from a huge rail-mounted gun which the Germans kept in a tunnel. The gun was eventually sealed from both ends of the tunnel. C. Ivan Smith's awards include the 1939 - 45 Star and Victory Medal. He flew Mustangs and Typhoons on operations.

F/Lt. Robert E. Spooner, D.F.C., joined the Air Force in 1941 at High River, Alberta. In September, 1944 he commenced operations against the enemy with 438 Squadron at Melsbroek, flying Typhoons. By November he was a Flight Commander, and flew support for the Nijmegan attack and in the Ardennes. Other adventures included train-strafing and a mid-air collision in cloud, with both aircraft returning safely to base. F/Lt. Spooner completed 97 sorties.

F/O Allan Nixon was born in Gore, Quebec. He trained on Hurricanes, and by June 1944 was in Britain, O.T.U. on Spitfires at Kirton in Lindsey, Lincolnshire. He converted to Typhoons and was posted to 438 Squadron at Eindhoven, Holland, in December of 1944. He flew 16 operational trips before being shot down by ground fire and captured on Valentines Day, 1945. F/O Nixon was liberated from a P.O.W. camp near Mooseburg (along with 28,000 other prisoners) by General Patton's 3rd. Army.

F/Lt. Roy Burden was with 118 Squadron on Annette Island, Alaska, flying Kittyhawks in June of 1943. In November he joined 438 Squadron, training on Hurricanes and converting to Typhoons at Ayr, Scotland. In March, 1944 Burden was on dive-bombing operations over Europe, striking V-1 launch sites. On D-Day he bombed coastal defences at dawn and witnessed the historic invasion from his Typhoon cockpit. On June 14 he was dive-bombing bridges and motor transport. Through August he was shooting up staff cars, despatch riders, etc. Shortly afterwards, he was severely injured while riding a captured motorbike, but was back with 438 Squadron by February. He then went to train-busting missions with delayed action bombs and flew his 98th and last operational sortie on May 3, 1945.

F/Lt. Bill Clifford enlisted in the air force at Hamilton, Ontario. After flight training his dream came true: he was flying Spitfires! But shortly thereafter, the entire group converted to Typhoons. Casualty rate on this aircraft was high, as they were much in demand after D-Day. At Eindhoven he was with 440 Squadron. Casualties were never ending. Fifteen pilots were KIA and four downed pilots became P.O.W.'s before the war was over.

F/O Ralph Downing was born in Vernon, British Columbia. Graduating from pilot training in 1942, he was then posted to England with the R.A.F. By 1943 he was with 184 Squadron stationed near Bath, Somerset, on Hurricanes which featured 40mm anti-tank cannons which were later replaced with rockets. In early 1944 the squadron converted to Typhoons. This was a big improvement with 400 m.p.h. speed and especially effective against Tiger tanks. F/O Downing was shot down by a German fighter on August 17th, 1944 and became a P.O.W.

F/O John Porter is from Prince George, B.C. and joined the R.C.A.F. in August 1941. In England he was posted to 247 Squadron R.A.F. at Bradwell Bay in Essex. He flew Typhoons and completed his tour in November 1944. Awards include A/C Europe Star, 1939 - 45 Medal, France/Germany.

F/Lt. Harry James Hardy, D.F.C., C.D. Born in Virden, Manitoba, Harry Hardy joined the R.C.A.F. in 1941 where he was introduced to the tiger Moth. At #6 Service Training School at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, he trained on Cessna Cranes and received his wings. He subsequently also flew Lysanders, Bolingbrokes, Hurricanes, Kittyhawks and Harvards.

He was posted to England in 1943 and joined #61 O.T.U. at Rednal, where he flew Spitfires. One day in April, his Spitfire was involved in a mid-air collision, and he was left with only his seat. Next was Hawker Hurricanes at #3 Tactical Exercise Unit in Scotland, and a spell on Typhoons. Further training at Bognor Regis (#83 Group Support Unit) preceded his move into operations with 440 Squadron, operating from B9 Cruelly, France.

F/Lt. Hardy lost 'Pulverizer 1' when the whole squadron became lost while flying from Amiens to Brussels, and all nine aircraft force landed. 'Pulverizer 2' crash landed during the 'Battle of the Bulge' when hit by flak from a tank, but Hardy baled out again. 'Pulverizer 3' was taken off the line, presumably due to flak damage. Finally, 'Pulverizer 4' was the Typhoon he flew to the end of his tour. F/Lt. Hardy flew a total of 96 sorties. During his flying career, he had three forced landings and two bale-outs.



20 Remarques w/TWELVE signatures.

F/Lt. Ken Storey joined 56 Squadron (Hurricanes) in the summer of 1941. They received the first two Typhoons issued to the Royal Air Force (September) and he flew one of these. He enjoyed two complete engine failures on Typhoons (for which they were renowned). His wrecked cockpit is currently on display at Duxford. He hit a Ju-88 on one sortie, and on a strafing run received a long line of bullet holes across the wing and spinner. At war's end he was with 29 Night Fighter Squadron (Mosquito's).

F/O George 'Lefty' Whitman was born in Pennsylvania, U.S.A. and enlisted in the R.C.A.F. in1941. In September 1942 he was posted to England with #3 (F) Squadron, R.A.F. at Manston, flying Hurricanes, Typhoons and Tempests. Shot down in September 1943 by flak and ditched in the sea. (First ever ditching of a Typhoon). While in his dinghy was strafed and wounded by two Me109's. His dinghy was sunk but he was rescued by a Walrus aircraft. He later destroyed an Me109G, the first enemy aircraft destroyed by a Tempest in the air. F/O Whitman also shot down 14 flying bombs. Later in the war he became a test pilot. His decorations include France/Germany Star and Air Defence Great Britain Medal.

F/Lt. Art Younger joined the R.C.A.F. in January 1941. After serving in the Middle East during 1942, he was with 186 Squadron in Scotland on cannon-firing Hurricanes. Converted to Typhoon in November 1943. In 1944 he was with 247 Squadron R.A.F. and was involved in Typhoon rocket attack operations in Normandy. He struck V-1 sites, 'no bail-out targets', radar sites and other ground targets. He was shot down at Falaise on August 13th, 1944 and was taken prisoner. He had a total of 69 operational sorties.

F/Lt. Ivan Mouat joined the R.C.A.F. in 1940. He trained at #3 EFTS Regina and #11 SFTS Yorkton, Saskatchewan. Shipped overseas in September 1941. He was posted to 412 Squadron on Spitfires, then to 56 Squadron on Typhoons. He was one of the first four Canadian pilots to fly this new aircraft type. He was then with 198 Squadron, also Typhoons. Ivan Mouat was shot down on July 11th., 1943 and was taken prisoner in Stalag Luft III. He has a total of 25 operational sorties.

F/O A. M. Scott. After training in Canada and a stint flying Miles Masters at Turnhill, England, Scott converted to Typhoons and joined 440 Squadron at Eindhoven, Holland. He flew a total of 30 operational trips. Among his many exciting experiences was a spectacular wheels-up landing in his Typhoon near the Rhine River after his tail had been damaged by flak.

F/Lt. C. Ivan Smith is from Ancaster. Ontario. He joined the R.C.A.F. and was sent to England in January 1943. He was posted to 268 Squadron, R.A.F. By May 1944 he was on operations. On D-Day he was over the beach-head, directing fire for battleships on to ground targets. After the squadron moved to France, they were bombarded from a huge rail-mounted gun which the Germans kept in a tunnel. The gun was eventually sealed from both ends of the tunnel. C. Ivan Smith's awards include the 1939 - 45 Star and Victory Medal. He flew Mustangs and Typhoons on operations.

F/Lt. Robert E. Spooner, D.F.C., joined the Air Force in 1941 at High River, Alberta. In September, 1944 he commenced operations against the enemy with 438 Squadron at Melsbroek, flying Typhoons. By November he was a Flight Commander, and flew support for the Nijmegan attack and in the Ardennes. Other adventures included train-strafing and a mid-air collision in cloud, with both aircraft returning safely to base. F/Lt. Spooner completed 97 sorties.

F/O Allan Nixon was born in Gore, Quebec. He trained on Hurricanes, and by June 1944 was in Britain, O.T.U. on Spitfires at Kirton in Lindsey, Lincolnshire. He converted to Typhoons and was posted to 438 Squadron at Eindhoven, Holland, in December of 1944. He flew 16 operational trips before being shot down by ground fire and captured on Valentines Day, 1945. F/O Nixon was liberated from a P.O.W. camp near Mooseburg (along with 28,000 other prisoners) by General Patton's 3rd. Army.

F/Lt. Roy Burden was with 118 Squadron on Annette Island, Alaska, flying Kittyhawks in June of 1943. In November he joined 438 Squadron, training on Hurricanes and converting to Typhoons at Ayr, Scotland. In March, 1944 Burden was on dive-bombing operations over Europe, striking V-1 launch sites. On D-Day he bombed coastal defences at dawn and witnessed the historic invasion from his Typhoon cockpit. On June 14 he was dive-bombing bridges and motor transport. Through August he was shooting up staff cars, despatch riders, etc. Shortly afterwards, he was severely injured while riding a captured motorbike, but was back with 438 Squadron by February. He then went to train-busting missions with delayed action bombs and flew his 98th and last operational sortie on May 3, 1945.

F/Lt. Bill Clifford enlisted in the air force at Hamilton, Ontario. After flight training his dream came true: he was flying Spitfires! But shortly thereafter, the entire group converted to Typhoons. Casualty rate on this aircraft was high, as they were much in demand after D-Day. At Eindhoven he was with 440 Squadron. Casualties were never ending. Fifteen pilots were KIA and four downed pilots became P.O.W.'s before the war was over.

F/O Ralph Downing was born in Vernon, British Columbia. Graduating from pilot training in 1942, he was then posted to England with the R.A.F. By 1943 he was with 184 Squadron stationed near Bath, Somerset, on Hurricanes which featured 40mm anti-tank cannons which were later replaced with rockets. In early 1944 the squadron converted to Typhoons. This was a big improvement with 400 m.p.h. speed and especially effective against Tiger tanks. F/O Downing was shot down by a German fighter on August 17th, 1944 and became a P.O.W.

F/Lt. Harry James Hardy, D.F.C., C.D. Born in Virden, Manitoba, Harry Hardy joined the R.C.A.F. in 1941 where he was introduced to the tiger Moth. At #6 Service Training School at Yorkton, Saskatchewan, he trained on Cessna Cranes and received his wings. He subsequently also flew Lysanders, Bolingbrokes, Hurricanes, Kittyhawks and Harvards.

He was posted to England in 1943 and joined #61 O.T.U. at Rednal, where he flew Spitfires. One day in April, his Spitfire was involved in a mid-air collision, and he was left with only his seat. Next was Hawker Hurricanes at #3 Tactical Exercise Unit in Scotland, and a spell on Typhoons. Further training at Bognor Regis (#83 Group Support Unit) preceded his move into operations with 440 Squadron, operating from B9 Cruelly, France.

F/Lt. Hardy lost 'Pulverizer 1' when the whole squadron became lost while flying from Amiens to Brussels, and all nine aircraft force landed. 'Pulverizer 2' crash landed during the 'Battle of the Bulge' when hit by flak from a tank, but Hardy baled out again. 'Pulverizer 3' was taken off the line, presumably due to flak damage. Finally, 'Pulverizer 4' was the Typhoon he flew to the end of his tour. F/Lt. Hardy flew a total of 96 sorties. During his flying career, he had three forced landings and two bale-outs.

Sheet Size: 22" high x 34" wide.