Tuskegee Titans by Robert Bailey

$155.00
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There are only 2 items left in stock.
There are only 2 items left in stock.
There are only 3 items left in stock.

As the Allied juggernaut rolled on toward the final collapse of the Third Reich in the spring of 1945, fighter aircraft of the 8th, 9th, 12th and 14th Air Forces fanned out in all directions, seeking targets of opportunity.

It was evident to all that the last days of the global struggle to end tyranny was near. It had taken four and a half years to arrive at this stage of the world war at great cost in human lives, both civilian and military against Germany, Italy and Japan. For the Germans, it had finally come down to this: a retreat back to its own borders, and a collapse into anarchy and foreign occupation. Faced with the Russians approaching the outskirts of Berlin in the east and the Allied armies crossing the Rhine in the west, the German army began its final retreat in disarray. By now, it was short of motivated foot soldiers and was desperate for supplies ranging from food and ammunition, to petrol.

Challenged with all this, they still had to face the ‘Jabos,’ which roamed the countryside, looking for anything and everything that moved and which could be interpreted as a target. It was at these times that the Germans paid their dearest price. Tanks, ground troops and armored personnel carriers were hit almost daily. These encounters were no piece of cake for the pilots either. It was serious business, often at very low altitudes and more dangerous than air to air combat.

In Robert Bailey’s action drama, P-51’s of the 99th F.S., 322nd F.G., have set upon an unfortunate armored column headed back to Germany in broad daylight.

American Eagles Edition Signed by:

Lieutenant Colonel George E. Hardy hailed originally from Philadelphia, Pa. During 1945 he was based at Ramitelli, Italy, with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, flying the P-51 Mustang. He flew 21 combat missions. In addition, 45 combat missions over Korea in the B-29 and 70 combat missions in AC-119K Gunships over Vietnam. Decorations include The Air Medal with 2 O.L.C.’s, Air Medal (Korea) with 3-7 O.L.C.’s and DFC (Vietnam) Air Medal with 8-11 O.L.C.’s. He retired as a Lt. Colonel.

Staff Sergeant James A. Sheppard is originally from New York City, New York. He enlisted in the Air Force in October 1942 and was assigned to the Tuskegee Army Airfield with the 332nd Fighter Group, as an Aviation Maintenance Technician. He served with the 100th F.S. and later with the 301st F.S. in the U.S. and in Europe as a Mechanic and Crew Chief. James Sheppard holds the following certificates: Aviation Mechanic, Senior Parachute Rigger and Airplane Pilot S.E.L. He retired in 1987 from the F.A.A. where he was a Supervisory Aviation Safety Inspector.

F/O James C. Warren began his career as one of the original Tuskegee Airmen. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Forces in November 1942 and retired with the rank of Lt. Colonel in 1978. He served in WWII in the 477th Bombardment Group (medium) and flew more than 173 combat missions, including the Korean and Vietnam wars. Awards include the DFC with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Air Medal with 11 Oak Leaf Clusters, 3 Meritorious Service Medals and Air Force Commendation Medal. He is the author of Tuskegee Mutiny at Freeman Field.


Limited Edition Signed by:

Lieutenant Colonel Leo R. Gray was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was a replacement pilot for the 100th Fighter Squadron, next to last class. He arrived in Ramitelli, Italy, on 14th March 1945. 2nd Lt. Gray had a near encounter with two Me262’s while he and two other squadron mates were escorting home a P-38. But the jets broke off the attack when the Mustangs dropped tanks. He has 15 missions, and flew P-40’s, P-47’s and P-51’s in combat and retired as a Lt. Colonel. Decorations include Air Medal with Cluster and Presidential Unit Citation.

1st. Lieutenant George A. Taylor was born in Middlesex County, Virginia. He flew 120 combat missions in the P-39 Airacobra over Naples Harbor and the Anzio beach-head in the 12th Air Force Tactical Air Command. In the 15th Air Force he flew missions to southern France, southern Germany and the Ploesti oil fields, Romania. This was in the P-47 Thunderbolt and P-51 Mustang. He was with the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group. Decorations include 2 Bronze Stars and the Air Medal.

Flight Officer Charles A. Lane Jr. was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended the Harriett Beecher Stowe Teachers College, but studies were interrupted in 1943 when he entered the forces. He flew 26 combat missions in P-47’s and P-51’s with The Tuskegee, in the 99th Squadron. He was in the forces for 27 years, flying fighters, transports and the B-52. He has The Air Medal with 3 O.L.C.’s, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Sheet size: 31" wide x 20" high.


30 Artist Proofs w/EIGHT signatures. Signed by: Charles A. Lane, Robert L. Martin, Alexander Jefferson, Robert W. Lawrence, Richard D. Macon, James A. Sheppard, William H. Holloman III, George A. Taylor (w/TWO signatures: Martin & Jefferson, on companion print Destroyer Attack, matching numbers)

Lieutenant Colonel William H. Holloman III was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He flew P-51's with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, during early 1945. After World War II he flew P-47's with the 301st Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, and during the Korean War was a MATS pilot. On one mission he was flying the wounded back to the States from the Far East and Korea. He was also the first black helicopter pilot in the Air Force. Bill Holloman later flew with Pacific Western Airlines in Canada. He was recalled to active duty in 1966, serving in Vietnam and later in Europe. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Jefferson was born in Detroit. He graduated from Tuskegee Army Air Field and after combat training, joined the 'Red Tail' 332nd Fighter Group, 301st F.S. at Ramitelli, Italy. He flew 18 long-range escort missions for B-17 and B-24 bombers. On August 12th 1944, three days prior to the invasion of southern France, he was shot down by ground fire while strafing coastal radar installations. He spent the rest of the war as a POW and was liberated by General Patton's 3rd Army. He visited Dachau concentration camp and returned to the U.S. as an instrument instructor at Tuskegee Field. Decorations include the Purple Heart and Air Medal. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Flight Officer Charles A. Lane Jr. was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended the Harriett Beecher Stowe Teachers College, but studies were interrupted in 1943 when he entered the forces. He flew 26 combat missions in P-47’s and P-51’s with The Tuskegee, in the 99th Squadron. He was in the forces for 27 years, flying fighters, transports and the B-52. He has The Air Medal with 3 O.L.C.’s, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Captain Robert W. Lawrence was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey. He flew with the 99th Squadron, 318th Squadron and 301st Squadron. The mission from southern Italy to Berlin was the most memorable for him. Six hours and 40 minutes in the cockpit of a P-51 was a long time! He has 33 missions to his credit. Types flown were: PT-17, PT-19, BT-13, AT-6, P-40, P-47, P-51, C-47, B-25 and C-45. Decorations include Presidential Unit Citation, Air Medal with 2 Clusters, Victory Medal and European Medal.

1st. Lieutenant Richard D. Macon was born in Birmingham, Alabama. In 1943 he became a cadet and graduated as a fighter pilot. He then flew the P-40, P-39 and P-47. Lieutenant Macon became a replacement pilot with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group and has 16 ½ missions to his credit. On August 12th 1944, he was strafing ground targets over southern France when his Mustang was hit by ground fire. It was flipped upside down at treetop level and the right wing separated. The next thing Lt. Macon knew, he was lying in a field and his parachute had deployed. He learned that his plane had crashed into a building used by the Germans as a headquarters, killing over 40 German officers and soldiers. Lieutenant Macon’s neck was broken and the lower part of his body was temporarily paralyzed. Narrowly missing being shot by a firing squad, he became a P.O.W. for over 9 months. Decorations include The Air Medal, Presidential Citation and Purple Heart. He retired with the rank of Captain.

1st. Lieutenant Robert L. Martin was born in Dubuque, Iowa. He flew with the 100th Fighter Squadron and has 63 ½ missions to his credit. March 3 1945 he was shot down by ground fire over Zagreb aerodrome (Yugoslavia) and parachuted from the burning airplane. He was rescued by Yugoslav partisans but was not captured by the Germans. He pent five weeks in Yugoslavia and then returned to Italy by truck and plane. Decorations include DFC, Purple Heart and Air Medal with 6 O.L.C.’s.

Staff Sergeant James A. Sheppard is originally from New York City, New York. He enlisted in the Air Force in October 1942 and was assigned to the Tuskegee Army Airfield with the 332nd Fighter Group, as an Aviation Maintenance Technician. He served with the 100th F.S. and later with the 301st F.S. in the U.S. and in Europe as a Mechanic and Crew Chief. James Sheppard holds the following certificates: Aviation Mechanic, Senior Parachute Rigger and Airplane Pilot S.E.L. He retired in 1987 from the F.A.A. where he was a Supervisory Aviation Safety Inspector.

1st. Lieutenant George A. Taylor was born in Middlesex County, Virginia. He flew 120 combat missions in the P-39 Airacobra over Naples Harbor and the Anzio beach-head in the 12th Air Force Tactical Air Command. In the 15th Air Force he flew missions to southern France, southern Germany and the Ploesti oil fields, Romania. This was in the P-47 Thunderbolt and P-51 Mustang. He was with the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group. Decorations include 2 Bronze Stars and the Air Medal.

Destroyer Attack
Companion Print sheet size: 22" wide x 7" high.

Tuskegee P-47’s sink a German destroyer in the Adriatic Sea on June 25th, 1944. Lt. Gwynne Pierson was one of the four pilots who attacked, and it is reported that his strikes were the ones to hit the magazine of the destroyer, resulting in the sinking.


100 Group Edition with THIRTEEN signatures:

1st. Lieutenant Theodore G. Lumpkin was born in Los Angeles and drafted at Fort McArthur in L.A. before being shipped to Tuskegee. He served as an Intelligence Officer with the 100th Fighter Squadron in Italy from 1943 to October 1945. Decorations include the Victory Medal. Lt. Lumpkin retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

1st. Lieutenant Richard D. Macon was born in Birmingham, Alabama. In 1943 he became a cadet and graduated as a fighter pilot. He then flew the P-40, P-39 and P-47. Lieutenant Macon became a replacement pilot with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group and has 16 ½ missions to his credit. On August 12th 1944, he was strafing ground targets over southern France when his Mustang was hit by ground fire. It was flipped upside down at treetop level and the right wing separated. The next thing Lt. Macon knew, he was lying in a field and his parachute had deployed. He learned that his plane had crashed into a building used by the Germans as a headquarters, killing over 40 German officers and soldiers. Lieutenant Macon’s neck was broken and the lower part of his body was temporarily paralyzed. Narrowly missing being shot by a firing squad, he became a P.O.W. for over 9 months. Decorations include The Air Medal, Presidential Citation and Purple Heart. He retired with the rank of Captain.

1st. Lieutenant Robert L. Martin was born in Dubuque, Iowa. He flew with the 100th Fighter Squadron and has 63 ½ missions to his credit. March 3 1945 he was shot down by ground fire over Zagreb aerodrome (Yugoslavia) and parachuted from the burning airplane. He was rescued by Yugoslav partisans but was not captured by the Germans. He pent five weeks in Yugoslavia and then returned to Italy by truck and plane. Decorations include DFC, Purple Heart and Air Medal with 6 O.L.C.’s.

Staff Sergeant James A. Sheppard is originally from New York City, New York. He enlisted in the Air Force in October 1942 and was assigned to the Tuskegee Army Airfield with the 332nd Fighter Group, as an Aviation Maintenance Technician. He served with the 100th F.S. and later with the 301st F.S. in the U.S. and in Europe as a Mechanic and Crew Chief. James Sheppard holds the following certificates: Aviation Mechanic, Senior Parachute Rigger and Airplane Pilot S.E.L. He retired in 1987 from the F.A.A. where he was a Supervisory Aviation Safety Inspector.

1st. Lieutenant George A. Taylor was born in Middlesex County, Virginia. He flew 120 combat missions in the P-39 Airacobra over Naples Harbor and the Anzio beach-head in the 12th Air Force Tactical Air Command. In the 15th Air Force he flew missions to southern France, southern Germany and the Ploesti oil fields, Romania. This was in the P-47 Thunderbolt and P-51 Mustang. He was with the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group. Decorations include 2 Bronze Stars and the Air Medal.

F/O James C. Warren began his career as one of the original Tuskegee Airmen. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Forces in November 1942 and retired with the rank of Lt. Colonel in 1978. He served in WWII in the 477th Bombardment Group (medium) and flew more than 173 combat missions, including the Korean and Vietnam wars. Awards include the DFC with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Air Medal with 11 Oak Leaf Clusters, 3 Meritorious Service Medals and Air Force Commendation Medal. He is the author of Tuskegee Mutiny at Freeman Field.

1st. Lieutenant William B. Ellis was born in Atlanta, Georgia. He flew with the 332nd, 301st and 99th Fighter Squadrons of the 322nd Fighter Group, 477th Fighter Wing. After the war, he was one of the eight fighter pilots who transferred to the 477th Bomb Group, to fly the B-25.

Lieutenant Colonel Leo R. Gray was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He was a replacement pilot for the 100th Fighter Squadron, next to last class. He arrived in Ramitelli, Italy, on 14th March 1945. 2nd Lt. Gray had a near encounter with two Me262’s while he and two other squadron mates were escorting home a P-38. But the jets broke off the attack when the Mustangs dropped tanks. He has 15 missions, and flew P-40’s, P-47’s and P-51’s in combat and retired as a Lt. Colonel. Decorations include Air Medal with Cluster and Presidential Unit Citation.

Lieutenant Colonel George E. Hardy hailed originally from Philadelphia, Pa. During 1945 he was based at Ramitelli, Italy, with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, flying the P-51 Mustang. He flew 21 combat missions. In addition, 45 combat missions over Korea in the B-29 and 70 combat missions in AC-119K Gunships over Vietnam. Decorations include The Air Medal with 2 O.L.C.’s, Air Medal (Korea) with 3-7 O.L.C.’s and DFC (Vietnam) Air Medal with 8-11 O.L.C.’s. He retired as a Lt. Colonel.

Lieutenant Colonel William H. Holloman III was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He flew P-51's with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, during early 1945. After World War II he flew P-47's with the 301st Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, and during the Korean War was a MATS pilot. On one mission he was flying the wounded back to the States from the Far East and Korea. He was also the first black helicopter pilot in the Air Force. Bill Holloman later flew with Pacific Western Airlines in Canada. He was recalled to active duty in 1966, serving in Vietnam and later in Europe. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Jefferson was born in Detroit. He graduated from Tuskegee Army Air Field and after combat training, joined the 'Red Tail' 332nd Fighter Group, 301st F.S. at Ramitelli, Italy. He flew 18 long-range escort missions for B-17 and B-24 bombers. On August 12th 1944, three days prior to the invasion of southern France, he was shot down by ground fire while strafing coastal radar installations. He spent the rest of the war as a POW and was liberated by General Patton's 3rd Army. He visited Dachau concentration camp and returned to the U.S. as an instrument instructor at Tuskegee Field. Decorations include the Purple Heart and Air Medal. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Flight Officer Charles A. Lane Jr. was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended the Harriett Beecher Stowe Teachers College, but studies were interrupted in 1943 when he entered the forces. He flew 26 combat missions in P-47’s and P-51’s with The Tuskegee, in the 99th Squadron. He was in the forces for 27 years, flying fighters, transports and the B-52. He has The Air Medal with 3 O.L.C.’s, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Captain Robert W. Lawrence was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey. He flew with the 99th Squadron, 318th Squadron and 301st Squadron. The mission from southern Italy to Berlin was the most memorable for him. Six hours and 40 minutes in the cockpit of a P-51 was a long time! He has 33 missions to his credit. Types flown were: PT-17, PT-19, BT-13, AT-6, P-40, P-47, P-51, C-47, B-25 and C-45. Decorations include Presidential Unit Citation, Air Medal with 2 Clusters, Victory Medal and European Medal.

Sheet size: 31" wide x 20" high.

Destroyer Attack
Companion Print sheet size: 22" wide x 7" high.

Tuskegee P-47’s sink a German destroyer in the Adriatic Sea on June 25th, 1944. Lt. Gwynne Pierson was one of the four pilots who attacked, and it is reported that his strikes were the ones to hit the magazine of the destroyer, resulting in the sinking.


10 Remarques w/Eight signatures. Signed by: Charles A. Lane, Robert L. Martin, Alexander Jefferson, Robert W. Lawrence, Richard D. Macon, James A. Sheppard, William H. Holloman III, George A. Taylor (w/TWO signatures: Martin & Jefferson, on companion print Destroyer Attack, matching numbers)

1st. Lieutenant Richard D. Macon was born in Birmingham, Alabama. In 1943 he became a cadet and graduated as a fighter pilot. He then flew the P-40, P-39 and P-47. Lieutenant Macon became a replacement pilot with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group and has 16 ½ missions to his credit. On August 12th 1944, he was strafing ground targets over southern France when his Mustang was hit by ground fire. It was flipped upside down at treetop level and the right wing separated. The next thing Lt. Macon knew, he was lying in a field and his parachute had deployed. He learned that his plane had crashed into a building used by the Germans as a headquarters, killing over 40 German officers and soldiers. Lieutenant Macon’s neck was broken and the lower part of his body was temporarily paralyzed. Narrowly missing being shot by a firing squad, he became a P.O.W. for over 9 months. Decorations include The Air Medal, Presidential Citation and Purple Heart. He retired with the rank of Captain.

1st. Lieutenant Robert L. Martin was born in Dubuque, Iowa. He flew with the 100th Fighter Squadron and has 63 ½ missions to his credit. March 3 1945 he was shot down by ground fire over Zagreb aerodrome (Yugoslavia) and parachuted from the burning airplane. He was rescued by Yugoslav partisans but was not captured by the Germans. He pent five weeks in Yugoslavia and then returned to Italy by truck and plane. Decorations include DFC, Purple Heart and Air Medal with 6 O.L.C.’s.

Staff Sergeant James A. Sheppard is originally from New York City, New York. He enlisted in the Air Force in October 1942 and was assigned to the Tuskegee Army Airfield with the 332nd Fighter Group, as an Aviation Maintenance Technician. He served with the 100th F.S. and later with the 301st F.S. in the U.S. and in Europe as a Mechanic and Crew Chief. James Sheppard holds the following certificates: Aviation Mechanic, Senior Parachute Rigger and Airplane Pilot S.E.L. He retired in 1987 from the F.A.A. where he was a Supervisory Aviation Safety Inspector.

1st. Lieutenant George A. Taylor was born in Middlesex County, Virginia. He flew 120 combat missions in the P-39 Airacobra over Naples Harbor and the Anzio beach-head in the 12th Air Force Tactical Air Command. In the 15th Air Force he flew missions to southern France, southern Germany and the Ploesti oil fields, Romania. This was in the P-47 Thunderbolt and P-51 Mustang. He was with the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group. Decorations include 2 Bronze Stars and the Air Medal.

Lieutenant Colonel William H. Holloman III was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He flew P-51's with the 99th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, during early 1945. After World War II he flew P-47's with the 301st Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group, and during the Korean War was a MATS pilot. On one mission he was flying the wounded back to the States from the Far East and Korea. He was also the first black helicopter pilot in the Air Force. Bill Holloman later flew with Pacific Western Airlines in Canada. He was recalled to active duty in 1966, serving in Vietnam and later in Europe. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Jefferson was born in Detroit. He graduated from Tuskegee Army Air Field and after combat training, joined the 'Red Tail' 332nd Fighter Group, 301st F.S. at Ramitelli, Italy. He flew 18 long-range escort missions for B-17 and B-24 bombers. On August 12th 1944, three days prior to the invasion of southern France, he was shot down by ground fire while strafing coastal radar installations. He spent the rest of the war as a POW and was liberated by General Patton's 3rd Army. He visited Dachau concentration camp and returned to the U.S. as an instrument instructor at Tuskegee Field. Decorations include the Purple Heart and Air Medal. He retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Flight Officer Charles A. Lane Jr. was born in St. Louis, Missouri. He attended the Harriett Beecher Stowe Teachers College, but studies were interrupted in 1943 when he entered the forces. He flew 26 combat missions in P-47’s and P-51’s with The Tuskegee, in the 99th Squadron. He was in the forces for 27 years, flying fighters, transports and the B-52. He has The Air Medal with 3 O.L.C.’s, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel.

Captain Robert W. Lawrence was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey. He flew with the 99th Squadron, 318th Squadron and 301st Squadron. The mission from southern Italy to Berlin was the most memorable for him. Six hours and 40 minutes in the cockpit of a P-51 was a long time! He has 33 missions to his credit. Types flown were: PT-17, PT-19, BT-13, AT-6, P-40, P-47, P-51, C-47, B-25 and C-45. Decorations include Presidential Unit Citation, Air Medal with 2 Clusters, Victory Medal and European Medal.

Destroyer Attack
Companion Print sheet size: 22" wide x 7" high.

Tuskegee P-47’s sink a German destroyer in the Adriatic Sea on June 25th, 1944. Lt. Gwynne Pierson was one of the four pilots who attacked, and it is reported that his strikes were the ones to hit the magazine of the destroyer, resulting in the sinking.